Blog Posts

Tommy Ly

Tommy Ly
As a research specialist at Pitsco, I stay up-to-date on the education curriculum industry and am part of a fun and dynamic team. I graduated from MSSU’s Computer Information Systems program and have a background in research analysis – a career in the US Army took me from Washington State to many places throughout the US. But my wife and I now call Missouri home, where we enjoy raising our two little ones. In my spare time, I can be found learning to play guitar, singing karaoke, playing video games, and coding.

Recent Posts

Computer Science Education Week: Teaching coding one hour at a time

Posted by Tommy Ly on December 06, 2018

This winter, as you keep the seasonal cold at bay, I hope you catch the Hour of Code. This week marks what has become quite famously known as Computer Science Education Week (CSEdWeek). The event began as an initiative with a purpose to improve access to and quality of technology education in schools by engaging policy makers. Its time frame in the second week of December honors the late Navy Rear Admiral Grace Hopper (December 9, 1906-January 1, 1992), a pioneer programmer who laid the groundwork for syntax-to-machine language compilers. And as computer folklore would have it, she was among the engineers in 1947 who discovered the first actual computer system “bug” – a moth to be precise (CSEdWeek).

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Topics: IN THE CLASSROOM, ROBOTICS, Technology, STEM, Coding, TETRIX Robotics, 21st Century Skills, Workforce Development

Ada Lovelace: Celebrating women in STEM

Posted by Tommy Ly on October 04, 2018

On the second Tuesday of October each year, we celebrate Ada Lovelace Day (ALD), founded in 2009 by journalist Suw Charman-Anderson to honor the many women in STEM (findingada.com); but you might be thinking, who in the world is Ada Lovelace? And why her? English mathematician Augusta King, Countess of Lovelace, more popularly known as Ada Lovelace, made her mark in history by publishing one of the first algorithms to be executed by a machine. And though the term computer didn’t exist in her time, this makes her the first published programmer.

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Topics: IN THE CLASSROOM, ROBOTICS, Culture, Science, Technology, STEM, Math