Lacey O’Brien

Lacey O’Brien
Hey there. I’m the Project Manager for Pitsco Education. Data and details are my thing. I’ve been doing this kind of work in the marketing and product development space for more than 7 years. My workdays consist of overseeing our Robotics portfolio and helping the amazing crew at Pitsco meet their deadlines. The best part of being a part of the Pitsco family is that we’re truly committed to serving students, teachers, and our colleagues. I’m also an alumna of our beloved Pittsburg State University two times over and a wife and mom to our daughter and a labradoodle. You can usually find me attending local events and Pitt State games and giving my time to a few community organizations.

Recent Posts

Move over R/C, there is a new way to control a robot!

Posted by Lacey O’Brien on January 31, 2019

It’s here, it’s finally here! With the delivery of the 2019 Big Book, Pitsco and TETRIX® Robotics released the much-anticipated TETRIX Tele-Op Control Module. The module connects to a TETRIX PRIZM® Robotics Controller and allows for remote control operation of your robot via Bluetooth. In layman’s terms (yep, this one is for me 😊), it serves as the go-between for transferring code from your PRIZM to the SONY PS4 DUALSHOCK 4 controller and its many buttons.

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Topics: ROBOTICS, News, Technology, Future Ready, TETRIX Robotics, 21st Century Skills

How to build 64 pages of robots

Posted by Lacey O’Brien on September 24, 2018

Building a robot is a process. There’s prototyping, testing, and eventually a final product. In fact, its a lot like how we build our catalogs.

Our goal for the catalog project is always to build a top-notch catalog for you – the builders, makers, coaches, and educators. We also know the final design needs to fit within a page count that is a multiple of 16. We start with prototyping to decide where and how the products are displayed and what resources are included, all while watching that page count. Then we go into the testing phase, reviewing our first draft for errors, things that might not have worked as expected, or missing information. Like with any build process, we generally reiterate, making changes to what we identified. After retesting until we’ve met our goal, it’s off to production and then ultimately to your hands (or screen). 

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Topics: ROBOTICS, Camps, Technology, Activities, TETRIX Robotics, Hands-on Learning